A Scientific Breakthrough Changing History

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While most of us have been working, going to school, or playing sports, a team of archeologists from the University of Oregon have been excavating a group of caves called Paisley Caves, in central

While most of us have been working, going to school, or playing sports, a team of archeologists from the University of Oregon have been excavating a group of caves called Paisley Caves, in central Oregon. Recently, the team has uncovered a historical breakthrough, various arrowheads that differed from the arrowheads of the Clovis.

The Clovis were a group of people that scientists believed to have lived in North America more than 13,000 years ago. Many people also believe that the Clovis were the first humans to inhabit the area that is now The United States of America or the continent, North America. The Clovis generally began settling in central America after crossing the land bridge over a small part of the Pacific Ocean. The large discovery made recently, had many scientists, historians, and the average person check their data and understanding about who the first people in North America were.

 Dennis L. Jenkins and his group of archeologists began digging in the Paisley Caves in 2002. For six years, the team did not find a single artifact, but they did not give up. Finally, in 2008 the group discovered human remains or DNA in the caves.

“The remains were preserved because the cave was so dry.” quoted Dennis L. Jenkins, “The problem was that we didn`t have the mini artifacts to go with [our findings]. People questioned whether or not our findings were real.”

In 2009 to 2011, the archeologists found what they were looking for, arrowheads that differed from the Clovis arrowheads, found in the past. The arrowheads found were small and much narrower than the Clovis points. Arrowheads found and labeled as Clovis artifacts, were large and each head had a very narrow crack running straight down the middle. When the group used a method called Radiocarbon, which determines how old the artifact is, they found out that the new arrowheads were more than 13,000 years old, maybe even older than various Clovis artifacts. Now scientists do believe that there were at least two groups of people living in North America more than 13,000 years ago.

“We have more than a single cultural group on the landscape, and that is important because it helps us open our eyes to the fact that we have missed things in the past,” Dennis L. Jenkins said. “This is just one more piece in the puzzle of how people got to North and South America. ”