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Dear Martin

“Dear Martin” By Nic Stone is an amazing book about segregation in our today community. It is told through the eyes of Justice McAllister a black high schooler.
 
Justice McAllister grow up in a rough neighborhood. Lots of gangs, drug dealers and a ton of illegal things happening. None of that matters to him though. He is seventeen and graduating high school this year. He is top of his class at Braselton Prep, captain of the debate team, and set on going to an Ivy League school next year.
 
His one problem is none of these things matter to police officers. Never. He was put in handcuffs for trying to drive his girlfriend home while she was drunk. The cops saw it the wrong way and put him in handcuffs. Really tight handcuffs. He is eventually let go with nothing but a couple bruises on his wrists, and no charges.
 
After this event happens Justice is self conscious about everything he does. He doesn’t want to end up in that situation again. To stay out of trouble Justyce looks to the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He starts writing letters to him, in a notebook for him to keep. He asks himself what would Martin do in this situation? And that helps all up until a day he was hanging out with Manny, his best friend. They had the music up, way up in the car, driving just to be driving. It took one aggravated, white, off duty cop for bad things to happen. And it did. Shots were fired.
 
“Dear Martin” is an incredible book. This book did a great job looking into the life of a black teenager growing up in what is supposed to be an equal country. It shows the daily struggles that are still happening today to black women, men and children. It’s an amazing book, with a powerful message.
 
“Dear Martin” By Nic Stone should not be read by young children. There is a lot of cursing, drinking, violent police scene descriptions and other things that make this book in appropriate for young children to read. For all the young adults/ adults who want to read this, it is a must read.