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How to become a Business Owner

photo by Nancy Deison

An entrepreneur is a supervisor, a role model, a leader. Owning your own business takes confidence, perseverance, dedication and resourcefulness. However, starting your own business is ludicrous, wild, risky and gutsy. So why did so many people take a job as a enterprise owner? Hear three different views from three different business owners.

Josh and Katie Dinar, owners of River and Woods restaurant in Boulder, CO, stated that the main perk of owning your own business was the freedom to be creative. But there are challenges that come along with this and they confront you everyday. With this particular profession you have to “make sure your staff is happy, that your customers are satisfied, that there’s enough money to pay the bills and, that all the things that need to be done are done.” These complications can be overwhelming but still can be managed. Josh’s first job gave him the opportunity to learn customer service. He worked at a clothing store and made 1.10 an hour. He says how rewarding it can be to engage with people, and how he thought that it was his first real life experience with everyday problem solving. Josh’s one piece of advice for kids wanting to start their own business is to listen to everyone and then ignore everyone. “If YOU believe in your heart that something will work, and you’re smart about it, and you think through the downsides as carefully as possible, then you can make it happen.”

Sandra Vanatko, owner of Indra’s Grace yoga and meditation studio, says that she felt blessed to do the work that she loved. She also loved the fact that she got to choose what she did and that it’s really fun helping people feel better. The biggest challenge that she encountered was not knowing when to delegate jobs and when to get help and having someone else contribute to managing the business. The bottom line was that she didn’t have a plan for growth. Her first job was making business cards with crayons and advertising her experience in babysitting. So, your first job doesn’t technically have to be one where you get paid and have a boss, but it can be your own business. Sandra’s piece of encouraging advice for kids interested in starting their own business is to pick something you really love doing because when you love what you're doing you work really hard and get a good income later on. Most people pick a job for the pay but if you love what you do, you never work a day in your life.

Simeon Margolis, owner of Good Day Chocolate, says that he enjoys having to do a little bit of everything that is involved in the business, such as, sales, marketing, manufacturing, and financing. Simeon says that he always knew that he wanted to own his own business as a kid, that he wanted to work for himself. In middle school and high school, he started several businesses like a basement cleaning service, baking bread and taking it door-to-door and a garage service. To prepare for his role as an entrepreneur, Simeon received his graduate degree in business. Being an entrepreneur has its perks despite its challenges. Simeon tells young kids to start young and don’t wait for someone else’s permission. Don’t worry about what other people tell you is and is not possible, always be trying and learning from your mistakes!”

There is no right path to take to becoming an entrepreneur. All three business owners started somewhere small and worked their way up. Just always remember, “If YOU believe in your heart that something will work, and you’re smart about it, and you think through the downsides as carefully as possible, then you can make it happen.”

 

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