Author Bios

Articles by this author:

  • “The Elementia Chronicles: Quest for Justice” by Sean Fay Wolfe is the first book in a trilogy of unofficial Minecraft fanfiction. The book follows the adventures of Stan2012 (Stan), and his new friends KingCharles_XIV (Charlie) and KitKat783 (Kat) as they seek justice and battle for their survival in the server of Elementia.
     

  • Itzhak Perlman is many things including; a famous violinist, an inspiring teacher, and an advocate for disabled people. When he was around four years old, he decided he wanted to play the violin. It was around that time that he contracted polio. His second teacher (Rivka Goldgart) had heard of the diagnosis, and was initially reluctant to teach a disabled child, but met with him anyway. “Actually, the disability did not play any part… The only difference when you study the violin is you stand up when you play. I would say 90% (of the violinists in the world) or even more sit down when they play… So in my case, that was it. I was not playing with my feet, I was playing with my hands.”

  • When I think of the word ‘Christmas,’ I imagine a little girl, some mice, a sugarplum fairy, some tin soldiers, the evil mouse king, and the beloved wooden nutcracker. Perhaps you’ve seen the ballet, but have you ever paused to think about how much effort it takes to put on the show, with all of the special effects?

  • ‘Boy’s Best Friend’ by Kate Banks and Rupert Sheldrake is about two boys named George Masson and Lester Shoe, and their dogs, Bart and Bill Gates, respectively. Lester is the new kid who moved to Cape Cod (where the story takes place) from Denver. He likes mustard, and has quite a bit of trouble fitting in. George is a slightly depressed boy, whose best friend moved to North Carolina a while back.

  • ‘The Peanuts Movie’ is about Charlie Brown, a little round-headed kid who can never do anything right. (If you didn’t know this about him, then you probably know next to nothing about ‘Peanuts.’ Go look it up.) However, one day his luck seems to change. A new kid (the Little Red-Haired Girl) moves in across the street, and this seems like the perfect chance to start over, and make a good first impression. Charlie Brown then promptly knocks over an entire fence, to his dismay. He does not quit, though. Throughout the movie, he constantly tries to impress his crush, the Little Red-Haired Girl, and constantly ends up embarrassing himself in one way or another.

  • Snap Circuits® Arcade (made by Elenco and winner of The American Specialty Toy Retailing Association’s Best Toys for Kids award in 2015) is an electronic circuit assembly kit with over 200 fun projects and a lot to teach. Its pieces snap together like a LEGO® set. Some of the included parts are a base grid, a programmable fan, and an LED display with a microcontroller.

  • As Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts." However, in "As You Like It," it isn't a man who plays those many parts.

  • The Colorado Music Festival and Center for Musical Arts is a nonprofit performing arts organization. “We have a mission to enrich the lives of people who live in the [Boulder] area by offering access to really high quality live music and also to education programs. It’s about educating folks, but also making their lives more fulfilling by making it more fun to live in this area,” says Andrew Bradford, the executive director of the organization.

  • Phamaly, a theater company comprised entirely of disabled actors, recently traveled to Japan to bring their brand of accessible magic to Osaka’s International Communication Center for Persons with Disabilities (BIG-i).

  • Alan Sitomer, a winner of the 2007 California Teacher of the Year Award and an author who has written nineteen books (including “Caged Warrior,” “Noble Warrior,” “Homeboyz,” and “Daddies Do It Different”) has one major thing to say about education: “Literacy is linchpin.”

  • Containing everything from the emotional struggles of Stephen Hawking to the most [stereotypically] English thing ever said, The Theory of Everything is an outstanding film that will leave viewers speechless.

  • Who are you? Does that affect how other people treat you? Does that affect your future? These questions are what History Colorado’s exhibit “Race: Are We So Different?” revolves around.

  • Featuring a wide array of paintings by Gauguin, Matisse, Picasso, Pollock, van Gogh, and more, the Modern Masters exhibit is truly gorgeous. Beyond the doors to the exhibit is not only a gallery, it is also the evolution of 20th century painting.

  • On a snowy Tuesday morning, the stockyard at the National Western Stock Show is a large chilly place. Pen after pen of cows slightly dusted with snow, like small city blocks separated by dirt and brick roads. Levi Ebert, a rancher from Kansas, is in a white tent near the auction house. Levi raises 40 heifers (cows up to two years old) per year, and he sells between 35 and 40 every year. The “elite” cattle are sold to commercial vendors, so that they can produce more beef. Levi also raises bulls; when asked why bulls sometimes have rings in their noses, he explained that it was a way to control misbehaving bulls. The nose is a sensitive place on a bull and slight pressure on the ring is enough to bring the bull under control.

  •      Kate DiCamillo has written many novels, including: The Tale of Despereaux (a Newbery Medal winner and animated motion picture), Because of Winn-Dixie (a Newbery Honor winner and motion picture), and The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane. She was recently at the Tattered Cover Book Store in Highlands Ranch to promote her new novel Flora and Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures.

  • Omen of the Stars, the newest addition to the Warriors saga by Erin Hunter is a very well crafted story about a bunch of cats that went into the wild. This series combines adventure, war, suspense, love and death from the perspective of a cat. In Omen of the Stars, three cats possess powers that no other cat has, but those powers are not that fun for the cats, though.

  • Imagine an epic battle in between the two greatest artists of the Renaissance. In my opinion, you just envisioned the Michelangelo and da Vinci side-by-side exhibit, which brings to mind the unfinished battle of the Titans.

  • What makes a man who can't swim float for 4,500 miles on a balsa wood raft? To find out, watch “Kon-Tiki,” directed by Sandberg and Ronning.

  • Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas” is about two men who became friends in the army during World War II. After the war, the two friends make it big in show business. Soon they meet a sister act, and all four characters embark on an adventure to Pine Tree Vermont. There, they go to Columbia Inn, which their former general owns. Unfortunately, the inn is going broke. Can they save it? Watch this hilarious musical to find out for yourself!

  • The book "Super Grammar" by T. Preciado and R. Montijo attempts to teach visual learners the rules of grammar using super heroes dressed in brightly colored costumes. They also attempt to teach how to fix grammar mistakes using villains dressed in dully colored costumes.