Squiggles-The Friendly Seasaurus

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Lauren McCulley writes, When I went to the Arvada Center I had the privilege to see Squiggles and meet up with Hillary Olsen who knew a lot abou…

When I went to the Arvada Center I had the privilege to see Squiggles and meet up with Hillary Olsen who knew a lot about Squiggles. For those of you who don’t know who Squiggles is, he’s a 343 foot long concrete seasaurus, that about 1,000 different people play on each year.Construction began in 1997 and ended in 1998, although planning started in 1993. Bill Gian was the person who created and designed Squiggles.They made everything wheelchair accessible, mainly because they wanted everybody all ages and abilities to join in on the fun. Also because a lot of the other Arvada Center attractions are for abilities. For example Shadow and audio describing.The handicapped climb Squiggles by parking their wheelchair next to the giant seasaurus and getting pushed up. They usually climb with their hands.The seasaurus us safe because if you fall off (which is highly unlikely), you land on a soft, rubber pad instead of concrete. In addition the scales aren’t black, so they’re not as hot and you don’t burn yourself. To make it even more fun the trashcans talk when you throw away tour trash. This is to encourage you to throw away your trash and not litter. Plus, water sprays out of Squiggles’ mouth, tail and fins five minutes of every hour.In a way kids created part of Squiggles, because the scales are made of designs from kids. People usually only have to repar Squiggles once every 3-5 years and clean him once a week.This special seasaurus is famous because he has won some rewards including Best Sea Monster in Westwood’s 1999 Best of Denver Edition, and was the winner of the statewide Starburst award for creative and cost-effective use of lottery funds. I hope by the time you’re done reading this, you’re on your way to the Arvada Center to climb on and play on Squiggles, the friendly seasaurus.