Iowa; what it means for all furture presidents

2
543

Rachel Faulkner writes, How many people out there are interested in who is going to be the next United States president?

How many people out there are interested in who is going to be the next United States president? How many people pay attention to election years? Well, if you don’t, you’re lucky, because I do, and I love election years like no other. Until recently, I didn’t know anything else about election years except that they happen every four years in November. Actually, it’s much more complicated than that. For example, one of the biggest parts of an election year happened last Thursday. That’s the day that the Iowa Caucuses took place. Each state votes in either a primary election or a caucus to decide on the one nominee. A primary is just when there is a ballot, like in regular elections. But in caucuses, something else happens. The people voting attend a large group. If they are Republicans, they do a show of hands vote after they listen to a speech from a supporter of each candidate. If they are a Democrat, they listen to the speeches, then gather in groups. If the group you choose has less than 15% of the voters there, you have to find a new group. After that, the large groups you are in, either Republican or Democrat, call in with their answers. The reason is why Iowa is so important is that it is the first of the states to vote, and typically, whoever wins the Iowa caucus succeeds in most of the other states too. Here’s a list of who’s who and where they placed last Thursday:Democrat:Borok O’bama FirstJohn Edwards SecondHillary Clinton ThirdRepublican:Mike Huckabee FirstMitt Romney SecondJohn McCain ThirdStay tuned to your local news station for more exciting news about Decision ’08, and the next President of the United States of America.

2 COMMENTS

Comments are closed.