Nature’s “Nightlights” . . . Why not in Colorado

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Ashley Achee writes, Fireflies also known as lightening bugs are one of the world’s most fascinating bugs on the planet!

Fireflies also known as lightening bugs are one of the world’s most fascinating bugs on the planet! They are part of the beetle bug family, but have not pincers and cannot bite. There are over 2,000 species and only 123 types are found in the United States. Fireflies emit a “nocturnal bioluminescence” – a light that comes from their lower abdomen, and some even glow with a pale green, red, orange, or yellow light, as opposed to the usual white light. The colors of the light produced depends on the type of firefly and the chemical produced to create the light. The lights are emitted to attract mates or preyThe light produced is “cold light” – it does not produce ultraviolet light or infrared heat. This is because the light the firefly produces is one hundred percent energy – normal light, like the kind in light bulbs – ten percent energy. They use 90% of their energy to emit their light. For a small one in size bug, they produce quite a bit of light. What an incredible, magical bug . . . . Nature’s “nightlight.”The most common months to see fireflies are June and July, but have you wondered why we don’t see fireflies in Colorado? Anyone living west of Kansas doesn’teither . . . . and no one knows why. Colorado with its high elevation is apparently not a desired habitat for fireflies. They like moisture and vegetation, and thrive primarily in low elevations with humid climates. They are in abundance in tropical Asia, as well as Central and South America. Their average lifespan is two months. In the United State, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and other southern states have the “privilege” of enjoying the “nightlights.” of these mysterious bugs. Recently however, there have been claims of people actually seeing fireflies in Boulder, and northern Colorado. Maybe more will come in the future . . . Sure wish they would!