Inkheart- Characters Really Brought to Life

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Bailey Cross writes, Grade: AEnter a world where the phrase “bringing characters to life” means much more than anyone ever thought possible…

Grade: AEnter a world where the phrase “bringing characters to life” means much more than anyone ever thought possible, where flying monkeys and unicorns exist side by side, and where if it’s written on paper, your wildest dreams can come true. Meet Meggie, just your average girl growing up in England. Average in all ways but one. You see, Meggie and her father, Mo, have a special talent, or is it a curse? Since the time Meggie was three, she has wondered why her father never reads aloud to her, where her mother disappeared to, and why she is forbidden to read aloud herself. When Dustfinger, a mysterious acquaintance of Mo’s suddenly appears, warning them of danger, Meggie learns more than she was ever prepared to. With their lives on stake and no one to trust but themselves, Mo, Meggie and Dustfinger set off on a wild journey that leads them to places they never wanted to return to. “Inkheart” (rated PG for some theatrical material) is in theaters now and recommended for ages 7 to 11.

5 COMMENTS

  1. Great job, Bailey!
    Great job, Bailey! A couple things though: the name is actually Dustfinger (no plural) Meggie (instead of Maggie), and I wouldn’t say that it’s reccommended for ages 7-11! My high school had a huge party or something where half of us went to see it the day after it came out. Other than that, great job! I loved the movie and the book! P.S. I am completely in love with Farid. Just kidding. 🙂

  2. Cool!
    Cool! Inkheart sounds awesome even though I haven’t seen it :-). Are you absolutely SURE that it’s okay for ages 7-11?

  3. It’s actually Maggie.
    It’s actually Maggie. I would describe the plot line a little more like who is the evil guy. (Capricorn and his men). I would alsorecommend the book, it is great. Otherwise nice job.

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