Dinner Time Diversion

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.It's 6:00, dinner has just begun, and my Mom, Dad, brother and I are all sitting around the table, staring at each other.

.It's 6:00, dinner has just begun, and my Mom, Dad, brother and I are all sitting around the table, staring at each other. Mom wavers on the note of starting a conversation, "Soo… how was your day in school?" she says, giving a hopeful smile that says "I know the answer, but why not try?" "Fine" we reply, with our usual uninformative brevity. Her guess was right! She tries again "Josh, can you tell me any interesting thing that you did in school today?" There is silence. "How about something boring?" She's getting just a tiny bit desperate. "Stuff" he finally answers between mouthfuls of meatloaf.

 

She sighs with resignation at the fruitless struggle of extracting information from her suddenly mute children. It happens this way every night. Parents trying to find out what's going on in their kids' lives and kids completely unable to recall a single thing.

 

Then Dad chimes in "Let's play a game", he says. "It's called Two Truths and a Lie. You tell everyone at the table two things that happened to you today that were true, and one lie. It can't be too obvious like 'today I went to school; I listened to my teacher, and I got eaten by a crocodile.' That would be no fun! I'll start…" and so the tradition began. We spent the rest of dinner trying to outdo each other in coming up with truth and lie puzzles that nobody could guess.

 

That little bit of competition was enough to jog the juvenile memories of my brother and me into recalling all sorts of things that happened to us that day. We even learned about stuff our parents did, which is usually not all that interesting.

 

A few of the funny ones that have come across are "Today I played with blocks, scored a touchdown, and had an 'inside day' for recess." That one was tricky, because it was our family's knowledge that the person who said the two truths and a lie (me) was in fourth grade, and fourth graders don't tend to play with blocks. If you take playing with blocks away, though, it seems impossible to have and indoor recess and score a touchdown! They all had trouble and no one guessed the lie. Sometimes the answers are silly, obvious, or very tricky, but the game keeps the family immersed and informed about each others' sometimes comical days.