Interview with Laurence Yep (description form)

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Have you ever wanted to write your very own story? To see your words published in bookstores worldwide? At the Mariott Hotel in Denver, CO, over thirty authors gathered to talk to local fans.

Have you ever wanted to write your very own story? To see your words published in bookstores worldwide? At the Mariott Hotel in Denver, CO, over thirty authors gathered to talk to local fans. One of them was Laurence Yep, a Chinese-American author with over 60 books published. Mr. Yep focuses on writing fiction stories that go back into Chinese history. "I like to write about outsiders too because I have always been one, due to my race," says Laurence Yep at our interview. "Although, surprisingly, I didn't always want to be an author."

 

When Mr. Yep was in high school in San Francisco, he was in love with science. "I really thought someday that I would be a chemist," said Mr. Yep, " but I got hooked on writing." His English teacher found potential in Mr. Yep, so, to pass the class, he had to get one of his writing pieces published in a national magazine. Once his article was perfected, Mr. Yep sent it in, only to be faced with a rejection letter. "Luckily, my teacher lifted the threat, knowing that all I could do is try. A rejection letter can let you down, but it just gave me more determination and the realization that I wanted to be a writer. In some of Laurence Yep's books, he goes back to his roots: science. This way he can do two things he loves and combine them into one story.

 

Even though writing about something you enjoy can be fun, it's certainly not easy. "I get writer's block quite a bit when writing a story," Mr. Yep told me. "But I have found that the best way to get through writer's block is to switch story ideas completely. That way, your brain can switch gears and maybe think of a better idea that way." I was fascinated to learn that every writer has trouble writing stories. Even if a story is great, like Mr. Yep's "Mia," "Dragon's Gate," "Dragon Wings," "The Rainbow People," "The Magic Paintbrush," and so many more, it didn't just pop into his head. It took time, effort, and tons of mistakes.

 

Which leads me to another of Mr. Yep's tips. "Practice and be observant. Write down any story ideas and pay close attention to the world. Record family events and other interesting experiences. They could become a great story one day!"