Rabbits Search for Happiness

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If you're looking for something to add to your summer reading list, you might want to try "Watership Down," by Richard Adams.

 

If you're looking for something to add to your summer reading list, you might want to try "Watership Down," by Richard Adams.

 

The story starts in Sandleford Warren, where there's plenty of space, grass, and a relatively close vegetable patch. Everyone's happy, until one fateful day when Fiver, a rabbit who can see glimpses of the future, has a vision. He foretells that something terrible is coming to Sandleford, and immediately tells his brother, Hazel. Fiver persuades Hazel to come with him and tell the chief rabbit, but the only problem is that the Chief doesn't believe them. The two brothers rally a group of rabbits and together they decide to go far away, to a place that is safe from the great danger Fiver has predicted.

 

Once they are out of Sandleford, they keep going. They travel far, facing incredible challenges. The rabbits face one danger after the next. They must learn to trust each other, because if they don't work together, they'll die. Will the rabbits make it to their utopia, or will they be stuck in the middle of nowhere for eternity?

 

Read "Watership Down," by Richard Adams to find out. This novel is aimed at kids over ten, because it's very complex, and the language is difficult to understand. The rabbits have their own words, so you might find yourself flipping to the glossary a lot.

 

Anyone who enjoyed the Warriors series, by Erin Hunter will probably like "Watership Down," as they share a lot of similarities. Among the many strengths of this book, one of the biggest is that you get extremely attached to the characters. Richard Adams creates such a realistic world, you imagine yourself part of the story.

 

This novel was originally published in 1972, about 39 years ago, but don't think that just because it's not new, you won't like it. "Watership Down" will give you a taste of classic literature, filled with adventure, plot, and character development, and keep you dwelling on the adventures of Hazel and Fiver long after you've read the last word.