Colorado’s History for the Next Generation

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In the wake of the closing of the Colorado History Museum, new opportunities have risen for the Colorado History Institute in their new museum, History In Colorado.

In the wake of the closing of the Colorado History Museum, new opportunities have risen for the Colorado History Institute in their new museum, History In Colorado.

Today, on Friday, July 20, 2012, YourHub NextGen reporters got a glance at an innovative and interactive exhibit, Destination Colorado, that gave an insight into life on the Eastern Plains. In the early 1900s, new settlers were attracted to Colorado by the chance to earn 640 acres of land in exchange for industrializing it with farms and new settlements. Although life was hard for the new residents, people were able to thrive in making farms, creating general stores, and raising families. People were still connected with remote locations through railroad systems, which allowed for easy access to the Plains and shipping from other states. Unfortunately, the towns were abandoned due to water shortages, leaving the past thriving communities as ghost towns.

As interesting as walking around and looking at precious artifacts is, the History In Colorado Museum helps younger attendants learn about Colorado’s history while also being entertained by extremely immersive displays inside the museum’s exhibits. The museum’s proud collection of artifacts are placed in perfect positions which people of all ages can reach. Featured among the many displays are a Model T automobile which is virtually drivable, collecting chicken eggs, milking cows, and smelling various scents of what was common in the past times. In the main lobby are two “time machines” placed on a giant map of Colorado, where visitors must work in unison to move them to different locations. Whenever the time machine reaches a significant landmark or region, a video from up to three different time periods can be chosen and watched. The time machines, as well as the other exhibits in this museum, are reminiscent of the way that we all got here-together.