Overland Pond — Wild About Denver

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Organized by the Audubon Society of Denver – Denver Parks and Recreation, Barbara Masoner and Mara Fielding-Purdy led a fun delightful program on Tuesday, August seventh for both adult and ch

Organized by the Audubon Society of Denver – Denver Parks and Recreation, Barbara Masoner and Mara Fielding-Purdy led a fun delightful program on Tuesday, August seventh for both adult and children to enjoy. Taking place at Overland Pond, this lagoon is located west to the South Platte River and is a vast, green geographical area with sea life varying from water snakes to freshwater clams. These two natural experts helped us examine and identify who was living in our city ponds, lakes, and streams. “Water is full of life, enjoy the outdoors and look at some of our tiniest wildlife”.

 

This program was simple, easy-to-grasp, hands on activity where we focused mainly on macroinvertebrate life in the pond. We used nets to find the insects, and then placed them in a tub full of water. Big sized insects without backbones were found underneath the rocks and near the shore of the pond. Some insects/bugs we found were scud, crayfish crawdad, snail, threadworm, tubiflex worm, mayfly, damselfly, dragonfly, mosquito, cadisfly, and dobsonfly. Each insect was classified starting off with shells or no shells. The classification genuinely spread into legs (no legs), wings (no wings). Most of the insects were barely visible to the naked human eye.

 

Knowing about the life in the pond can help us increase our knowledge on simple wildlife we never knew existed. I learned so many new things by just using nets and tubs and playing games! I put my brain to a new higher setting that I never thought had before. I would suggest these kind of programs for kids who are interested to learn about variety of things from ages seven and up. Children will want to stay hours caught up on one of the insects or bugs. For more information about these public environmental education programs, go to www.denvergov.org. Special thanks goes to Janet Metzenbaum, whose enthusiasm guided me every step of the way.