Plans and Hopes After Changing History

0
433

In 2011, a groundbreaking discovery questioned all of the data in America based on which group of people were the first people on the land that we call North America or the United States of America

In 2011, a groundbreaking discovery questioned all of the data in America based on which group of people were the first people on the land that we call North America or the United States of America. Our data had shown that a group called the Clovis had migrated across the land bridge connecting the continents first, but a professor named Dennis L. Jenkins and a team of archeologists from the University of Oregon, proved that theory wrong when they found older artifacts in the Paisley Caves, located in Central Oregon.

 Dennis L. Jenkins the head professor, leading the team of archeologists, explained, “My evidence is produced to address questions that are unusually important to the field of archeology. It helps us understand how and when the Native Americans came to America. It helps us evaluate current theories of colonization such as the Clovis First theory. If the people of the Western Stemmed tradition were here with the Clovis tradition people why didn't we know that sooner and what if there were other tradition people around as well? My data will, I hope, open other scientists eyes to new evidence, sometimes found in old places right in front of them all along. My next steps are to investigate more sites of this early period (13,000 to 16,000 years old). If I am correct we should be able to date other Western Stemmed sites, and possibly other kinds of points, to this time period as well. This cannot be the only site of that age and technological tradition. ”

 This unique discovery will be one of many new, history changing archeological events occurring in the next few years. Dennis L. Jenkins and his team have uncovered a secret about the past that was not discovered before, inspiring many young future archeologists. This scientific breakthrough will cause a chain reaction throughout the United States, enabling citizens of North America to learn more about the birth of their plentiful home country.