Spookygirl delightfully chilling

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What would you do if you had an amazing ability that you couldn’t tell anybody about? That’s the problem high school student Violet faces in Spookygirl, by Jill Baguchinsky.

What would you do if you had an amazing ability that you couldn’t tell anybody about? That’s the problem high school student Violet faces in Spookygirl, by Jill Baguchinsky.
Violet has always known about her special ability to see ghosts. Her mother was also a spirit-seer, and trained Violet in the skill-that is, until her mother was killed while investigating suspicious paranormal activity.
Several years after the accident, Violet is living with her father, who is the manager of a funeral home. They live in a small apartment above the home, and Violet often helps her father deal with newly deceased clients. She’s relatively happy at home, and school isn’t explicitly torture, even if it’s not the best experience of her life.
The day Violet gets her schedule, she is shocked and horrified to see that she is signed up for the dreaded class: gym. Normally, this class would only cause mild anguish, and this this is what Violet assumes will happen. Why would she expect a possibly evil gym teacher, revolting uniforms, and a haunted locker room?
Violet must juggle helping her dad with the funeral home, investigating paranormal activity in the locker room, trying to find a lost painting, and dealing with every day high school life. Can she do it? Read Spookygirl, by Jill Baguchinsky, to find out.
I would give this book 3 out of 5 stars, because, although it was enjoyable, it was also confusing. I felt like the author had trouble sticking to the story line, and it seemed like the plot got off track a lot. I would recommend this book to 11 and up, because it is confusing and there is some language.