Lego and Education Combined Leads to a lot of Fun

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At the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) conference in Denver, there were many exhibits, but the one that interested me the most was the Legos Education.

At the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) conference in Denver, there were many exhibits, but the one that interested me the most was the Legos Education. Usually people think of Legos as a fun and creative, but not necessarily educational.

 

Legos can be used to teach science, technology, engineering and math. I saw motorized legos that can do a lot of different things without a person manually moving them. Legos can be used to build and program real robots.

 

There are three different levels for Lego Education, the elementary level starts out about learning the mechanics and just using creativity to build something. The one I saw for that level was a moving ferris wheel that was hooked up to a computer.

 

The middle school level was the most interesting one I saw at the exhibit. They built a machine that would solve a Rubik’s Cube with no human interaction. The lego evaluated all the cubes with a color sensor then started manipulating it. It took approximately five minutes to solve the Rubik’s Cube puzzle.

 

The high school level had a small motorized and programmable car that was really amazing. After high school, an interested person could go to college, study engineering or math to get a job with Legos to help create more new things.

 

Lego Education is being incorporated into schools. According to the Lego Education website, EastLawn Elementary in North Carolina had poor test scores but that changed when they implemented BuildToExpress, a part of Lego Education. The hands-on-training engaged students and teachers to think creatively and learn at the same time. The teachers could create challenges, too. There were no wrong answers. They could use they’re imaginations and create whatever they wanted making learning more fun.

 

I really liked the idea of Legos and education, more than just the after school Lego Clubs. I would like to see more schools incorporate it into the curriculum. It’s a great way to stimulate the brain, learn to work independently and in groups, and to have fun.

 

 

Information from:
http://www.legoeducation.us/etc/images/educatorSpotlight/BTECaseStudy-Eastlawn.pdf