Believing and Dreaming Can Go a Long Way

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A person’s childhood can be vital to a healthy development, and those with a poor upbringing will often not have enough motivation to become successful and move on from their younger years.

A person’s childhood can be vital to a healthy development, and those with a poor upbringing will often not have enough motivation to become successful and move on from their younger years.

 

“A poor boy gets caught for drug possession and goes to jail; end of story,” author Jimmy Baca relates about his childhood. However, his time in prison is actually only the beginning of a successful journey in poetry and writing.

 

“I’m glad that I went to prison,” Baca states. “If I hadn’t gone then I would have never learned to read or write and I would have continued to be involved with drugs.” Jimmy Baca has taken his rough experiences and turned them into beautiful poetry. Past experiences aren’t his only inspiration for his writing, though.

 

“I write so I can see things in ways that I’ve never seen them before,” Baca explains. “Poetry is like magic, but I don’t write so I can be seen as a writer, I write because I enjoy it. My intent is to have fun.” Other hobbies that Baca considers fun are fishing, hiking, reading, and watching movies with his wife and 5 kids. “I live on a farm, and nature is my role model,” says Baca. “I see all kinds of wildlife every day: mountain lions, foxes, hawks. The more I study these animals, the more I can learn from them.” Not only does the writer learn from Mother Nature, but he also gains knowledge by traveling the country to attend workshops with his consultant and friend, Releah Cosset Lent.

 

“Jimmy and I met while I was writing a book called Literacy for Real. I wanted to include a poem in my book that went along with the teaching philosophies inside, so Jimmy Baca wrote “I am Offering You this Poem” to be featured with one of the lessons. From there we continued to work together to write a book called Adolescents on the Edge, which explains how teachers can use real-life literacy to teach adolescent students,” explains Releah Lent. “Jimmy and I work so well together because we have similar teaching philosophies. We both think that it’s important to honor and value the student. This will help to gain the student’s respect and confidence. You should feel safe when learning.”

 

As the interview came to a close, Jimmy Baca answered my final question as follows: “What are my favorite words? Believe and dream, because I had to do both of those things in order to become a writer.”