The haunting truth of the Amache Internment camp

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One way to describe the history of the Japanese Interment camps that plagued the western U.S during the time of world war two was heard From Mrs. B.

One way to describe the history of the Japanese Interment camps that plagued the western U.S during the time of world war two was heard From Mrs. B. Erin Cole, the assistant state historian who works at the Colorado history center. In her words, "The Japanese internment camps lasted from 1942-1945, and they were essentially camps or military installations built and designed by the U.S federal government to ideally and safely contain Japanese-American citizens who were thought to be loyal to Japan during the war of world war two."

The sad truth is that many of these Japanese citizens did not hate America at all. Many of them were very nice people, just trying to live ordinary American lives. Many of them loved America, and were inferiorated  by the thought that their own country disliked them.

Mrs. Cole has worked at the center as a historian for approximately 3 years. She is a very nice lady, who is passionate about her career and her pursuit to educate at the history center. She was as expressive as we were with us when we witnessed a replica of a common military barracks, which is what the Japanese-American citizens were housed in during their involuntary stay at the base, which is what the camp was really like!

 

There were large, short, long buildings that housed families, they were called blocks and were painted with numbers like block 12-E on the side. Many of the barracks were described as leaky, uncomfortable, and grim. People were allotted two suitcases  to live off of. Although people were unhappy about the living space,

they did not lose hope. Their faith and hope and love and compassion and understanding each other kept them alive. At least the ones that survived.

 

During their free time, many people took up the art of "Gaman" which was a homemade art of whatever they could find to be artistic with. They were paintings, beautiful drawings, nature scenes, and much more.

 

The Japanese citizens were released after the war in 1945,  but it took a fairly long time afterwards for change. by the 1980's President Ronald Reagan released a check for 20,000 dollars, and a personal apology from the government for the unjust treatment to families, and survivors. Many people were upset, and didn't take the money because the government was buying them out. There was no amount  of money that could repay the debt of pain that was suffered at the camps, people wanted the government to do more to make it right, to apologize, so many people were still upset.