Planetariums: An Epic Journey Through Space

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   Planetariums have come a long way since they first appeared in 1960.  At Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Dave Cuomo, Assistant Space Science Educator, runs the high tech show

   Planetariums have come a long way since they first appeared in 1960.  At Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Dave Cuomo, Assistant Space Science Educator, runs the high tech shows at the planetarium. Dave has always had an interest in astronomy since when the famous 1969 moon landing sparked his interest as a child.
 

 

   To set the massive dome-shaped display up he has to align six different projectors perfectly. Each projector is run by one computer and then there is one computer that runs all of the projectors and the computers.  With 118 seats and incredible graphics this planetarium is one of the museums best features. Four shows are playing now, but more are soon to come. These incredible features take you on a high definition journey through space.
 

 

   There are two different kinds of ways you can run a show at a planetarium. You can run it through a star ball, a sphere with a light with holes in the form of stars that show the earth’s view of the stars. Or, there are digital options that can be crafted with real and scientific sketches of stars and planets that are shown with projectors. When I talked to Dave he said that he prefers digital to star balls. “It’s just more flexible,” he says, “Also, if you are lying on the ground and staring up on the sky, it appears to curve which makes it more realistic. ”
 

 

   The night sky is a very interesting subject. Planetariums offer an opportunity for people in the city who can’t see the stars, to see space without going on a long trip. As you can see these breathtaking shows have come a long way since 1960.