When Evil goes Good and Good goes Evil

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I came into The School for Good and Evil thinking it was going to be a short, simple story about two girls who find their true selves.

I came into The School for Good and Evil thinking it was going to be a short, simple story about two girls who find their true selves. After reading the blurb, I figured that this book could go one of two ways- simple and shallow, or deep and intricate. When I got the book, I discovered it was the latter. It is at least one and a half inches thick and 488 pages. Also, the cover blew me away with its sleek appearance and gorgeous drawings of Agatha and Sophie that have their personalities written all over their faces.

 

Sophie is a shallow, vain girl who, subconsciously, does good deeds for her own promotion and to become a princess. Agatha, on the other hand, has low self-esteem and hates almost everyone, but really cares about the friendship she and Sophie share.

 

The supporting characters were also quite developed, from Sophie's malicious roommates to the shallow students and the School of Good.

 

The School for Good and Evil is about two girls who are thrown into a school that trains villains and heroes to survive their own fairy tale. Sophie and Agatha live in Gavaldon, where every four years, the School Master takes two children to the School for Good and Evil, where one becomes a villain and one becomes a hero. Sophie has always wanted to go to the School for Good, and Agatha seems a perfect match for the School for Evil, but when they arrive, they're sent in the opposite direction they expected.

 

There were only a few weak points to the book. Sometimes the author rushed scenes, and a few events weren't entirely explained. Also, there were some loose threads that weren't tied up at the end of the story.

 

This is a fun fantasy read with a lot of depth, some romance, and a touch of humor. I'd recommend this book to young adults, although most age groups would probably appreciate it.