Redheads Have More Fun

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Imagine a world where blondes don’t have more fun, and are in fact all outcasts. Why? Simply because of their hair- and the fact that it isn’t red.

Imagine a world where blondes don’t have more fun, and are in fact all outcasts. Why? Simply because of their hair- and the fact that it isn’t red. Alison Cherry’s Red is based in the fictional Iowa town Scarletville, also known as the national redhead sanctuary. In Scarletville, redheads have it all. But brunettes, blondes and “strawbies”, or strawberry blondes? Not so much. 17-year-old Felicity St. John is definitely well-off- pretty, popular, and well on her way to winning Scarletville’s renowned Miss Scarlet pageant, thanks to her long, wavy, red hair. But her enviable hair color that her social life rests upon is 100% imitation. Revealing that she is truly a strawbie would end her social life. Hair dye isn’t illegal in Scarletville, but it sure seems like it, as artificial redheads, or “arties”, are at the very bottom of the social ladder. Nobody knows her all-important secret…. Or does someone?
For a week I could not put this book down. A fun, ever plot-twisting read for girls of all hair colors, Red captures the audience and takes you to Scarletville, down to the last details. Readers will definitely enjoy the novel’s descriptive nature.
This novel was obviously intended for a teenage girl audience. Due to a very small bit of mature content, I would recommend this book only to a 13+ audience. However, the strong message that appearance is trivial and the “pageant mom” story of Felicity’s relationship with her mother rises above the turnoffs for teens.

1 COMMENT

  1. I really liked it but maybe

    I really liked it but maybe tell a little more on why you liked other than that it was perfect.

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