Bones, Stones, and Rubber Balls

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In the new 126,000 square foot addition to DMNS, school groups and summer campers will be amazed by the world of science.

In the new 126,000 square foot addition to DMNS, school groups and summer campers will be amazed by the world of science. Field trips will now be much more interactive and engaging, because students can play fun informative games about whatever subject their class is learning. Right now the learning studios are focusing on evolutionary adaptations. “We are theming an entire three-hour-long field trip instead of just having students go see an IMAX film or an exhibit,” says Karen Hays, Program Development Manager.

 

Two floors down are the archives, where the DMNS keeps its 1.5 million artifacts that are not on display ranging from ancient Mayan pottery to Lewis and Clark’s telescope. The old archives were much smaller and less advanced. “We have so much space, if someone asks where something specific is we can pull it right out for them,” says Bethany Williams, Anthropology Collections Assistant.

 

On the third floor, the space for visiting exhibits is huge, but the new Maya exhibit is so large, it stretches into the old exhibit space. At Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed, kids and adults alike can enjoy learning about the Maya ball game where you had to bounce a ball through a narrow hole in the side of the stadium with your hip, elbow, or knee. You can even try lifting the eight-pound rubber ball or see your name printed in Mayan glyphs and learn about the Maya underworld, Xibalba. “While this is a culture in a different place and time, kids can still connect to the lives of Maya children and the things they did. They will probably think their lives are fun,” says Samantha Richards, Educator/Coordinator for Earth Gallery Programs. Come to the museum and see if you agree with Ms. Richards!