Don’t Leave The Crossover Hanging

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“A bolt of lightning on my kicks…
    The court is sizzling.
My sweat is drizzling.
    Stop all that quivering.

“A bolt of lightning on my kicks…
    The court is sizzling.
My sweat is drizzling.
    Stop all that quivering.
Cuz tonight I’m delivering.”

    In The Crossover, by Kwame Alexander, Josh Bell has talent on the court, and the rhymes to back it up. But when everything goes wrong, can he dribble himself out of his troubles, or will he air-ball it?
    Josh and his twin brother Jordan are an unstoppable team on and off the court. And with the help of their dad, they can accomplish anything. But one day, a new girl comes to school, and Jordan starts spending less time with Josh and more time with her. And if things couldn't get worse, his dad, the person he looks up to most, is getting ill. When Josh takes his anger towards Jordan out on the court, he is banned from playing by his mom. As he works on righting himself, he comes to understand himself, and his family better. But his dad gets worse, and he doesn’t know whether he can save him. And he will need one shot to save everything, on and off the court.
    The Crossover is written in rhymes. All uttered from Josh’s lips, telling his story one rap at a time. This creative approach offers a new perspective on reading, and enhances Josh’s story. Throughout the story, we see Josh change, and feel the emotions expressed in his rhymes. I would recommend The Crossover to ages 10 and up, due to some intense scenes, and also to fans of Mike Lupica.

    “One…It’s a bird, It’s a plane. No, It’s up up
    Uppppppppppp.
    My shot is F L O W I N G, Flying, fLuTtErInG
    OHHHHHHHH, the chains are JINGLING
    Ringaling and SWINGALING
    Swish.
        Game/over”