Chainani Crushes the Cliches

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"My problem," mused author Soman Chainani, " was I thought the villain was the much cooler character."

 

"My problem," mused author Soman Chainani, " was I thought the villain was the much cooler character."

 

When growing up in Miami, Florida, Soman Chainani was that kid who destroyed puzzles, knocked down LEGO towers, and kicked down sand castles on the beach. And when he watched the Disney movies he loved, his favorite character tended to be the villain.

 

But as he grew older, Chainani realized that these Disney films were not the real stories; fairytales were much more sinister.

 

His studies of fairytales during college at Harvard University, where he majored in English, combined with his desire to show children the real tales, manifested into a book, The School for Good and Evil.

 

In The School for Good and Evil, Soman Chainani spins a dark tale that utterly crushes all cliches and blurs the line between good and evil into near nonexistence.

 

Then, in the second installment which came out in April, A World Without Princes, Chainani explores the roles of women in fairytales, while still capturing the magic of the first one.

 

His characters, Sophie — the pretty, pink-loving girl who was dropped in the School for Evil — and Agatha — the gloomy girl in the School for Good — even landed him a movie deal. To find out more and get information about how you could audition to be in the movie, visit schoolforgoodandevil.com.

 

Chainani has no concerns about the movie, except that it might be not as interesting as the book. "The problem is that it's very difficult to get a movie right in Hollywood because of how many people are involved," he told me, "so you end up making something a little bland." But he's writing the screenplay, and since he studied film at Columbia University, he's confident that it will stay true to the book.