Fictions at the DAM

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Every year, the Denver Art Museum has consistently magnificent displays of art, be it sculptures, paintings, or anything in between. One such display is Daniel Sprick's "Fictions".

Every year, the Denver Art Museum has consistently magnificent displays of art, be it sculptures, paintings, or anything in between. One such display is Daniel Sprick's "Fictions". The Colorado artist's works seem as if they are photographs. However, upon a closer look, the incredibly realistic portraits' edges show obvious brushstrokes, revealing that it is, in fact, a painting. The concept for this is reality dissipating into fiction, emerging and disintegrating realism. They almost seem to be backlit, glowing slightly, but there are no lights or glow-in-the-dark paints used. Incredibly enough, the "illumination" is just the pale yellow backgrounds of each portrait strongly contrasting the darker shades of the person depicted. It seems to give off a glow of sorts. Another illusion is that the oil painting is on canvas. In reality, according to Sprick, it is a hard material painted to look like canvas with the help of wire brushes. Each painting takes approximately 2-4 weeks to make, but Sprick is constantly adding to the portraits and changing details. The exhibit is a must-see, along with the other new exhibits. However, there is female nudity in a painting or two, which should be kept in mind if you want to bring young kids. I think the works in general are a little more geared toward adults considering the occasional nudity, but anyone can appreciate these stunningly real portraits. They will be at the DAM all summer.