Drawing Politics

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Mike Keefe sits down at his desk and starts to read the paper, at least that was how his day started for 13 years. He was an editorial cartoonist for the Denver Post but retired a few years ago.

Mike Keefe sits down at his desk and starts to read the paper, at least that was how his day started for 13 years. He was an editorial cartoonist for the Denver Post but retired a few years ago. Everyday he would look at stories in the news and doodle. This was how the people of Denver got their daily political cartoon in the newspaper.

Mike then drew symbols, to start getting his point across. While he was drawing an example,
Mike said,” The faster I go, the better I like the drawing.” Every once and awhile he would link two issues together in one cartoon, like in a cartoon about immigrant children and highway trust funds.

Cliches are another tool that Keefe enjoys toying with to get a point across. He has done cliches about a fish eating another fish, and a deserted island.

“You don’t always want [cartoons] to be funny,” Mike Keefe told the audience as he showed a pictured of a disturbed man behind a gun. He drew shortly after the 2011 shooting in AZ that put congresswoman Gabby Giffords in critical condition.

Third grade is when Mike started to recognize his talent for drawing. “I always liked to draw,” Mike said. Mike became aware of political issues when he joined the Marine Corp during the Vietnam war.

For more on Mike Keffe visit intoon.com or https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvYlCt5dRNc-ZSS7ByJwniw for politcal animations.