The Bodies We Wear

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The Bodies We Wear by Jeyn Roberts was an interesting combination of two genres: dystopian and coming-of-age. In a society of drug addicts and stereotypes, teenage Faye is trying to cope.

The Bodies We Wear by Jeyn Roberts was an interesting combination of two genres: dystopian and coming-of-age. In a society of drug addicts and stereotypes, teenage Faye is trying to cope. Her life is in shambles, in her eyes, she has nothing left to live for. Ever since a drug called Heam was forced on her and her friend, she has had to endure grudges and stereotypes much more powerful than even those in today’s society. Heam, or Heaven’s Dream, is the ultimate drug. It forces a person’s body into shutdown, and rumor has it that when you momentarily die, you glimpse heaven. But when Faye was given an overdose, she barely woke up from the dream. When she did, purple-black veins marred her skin like scars; she is marked as a Heam addict. The story follows Faye as she hides the marks from those at school, and trains by night to take her revenge on those who did this to her and killed her friend. But there’s just one more thing: Faye didn’t glimpse heaven, she saw hell, and that is going to stay with her forever.

This book was rather dark, I wouldn’t recommend it to people under the age of thirteen. Although I did enjoy this book, I wish that a few points and plot-twists had been explained a little better. Some parts were pretty confusing. The author left a lot of the imaginating to the reader. Sometimes that worked to the book’s advantage, but other times it detracted from the reader’s comprehension. The characters were well-developed and unique. By the end of the book I felt I really knew them, however there was always going to be parts of their lives or personalities that the reader could not fully grasp. I would recommend this book to people thirteen and up who are okay with a bit of uncertainty and darkness in the books they read.