Big Brother Trouble in Brotherhood

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After the civil war, the conflict was not over. This Shad, a young boy, knows this all to well. Brotherhood, by Anne Westric, is a story told from the point of view of Shad.

After the civil war, the conflict was not over. This Shad, a young boy, knows this all to well. Brotherhood, by Anne Westric, is a story told from the point of view of Shad. In the story Shad gets into I tight spot, he follows his older brother to a meeting of the secret meeting of a secret organization, the Klu Klux Klan. Shad is forced to be inducted into this society, which was against the freedom of slaves and rights being given to African Americans. Soon after this night Shad meets a freed slave and begins to like her, but he knows he would be killed if he quit the Klan. Unable to decide Shad begins to lead a double life.

This book is different from most other books. For one thing it begins at the end. Though this gives the book an interesting format, it also makes it somewhat hard to follow. The book can also have violence in parts. It takes place in a postwar era so the book makes it obvious that there is tension between people from the different sides of the war, and it also makes it evident that there is tension between the two races in the story. This tension adds excitement to the book but also may be hard for children under 10 to understand.

At some points this book can be hard to understand, because Shad is under educated and uses several double negatives and there are many grammatical errs. There is also some adult language, and racial terms. I would highly recommend this book for history fans 10 years old