Seeing Isn’t All There Is To Believing.

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What would you do when everything you know is turned upside down? Or rather, everything turns to black?

What would you do when everything you know is turned upside down? Or rather, everything turns to black? In the riveting new novel Blind, by Rachel DeWoskin, we follow Emma as she struggles to cope with an accident that costs the high school girl her vision, and changes the way she sees things forever- in more ways than one.

 

Emma had a fairly average life. She blended in at school, more or less. She and her best friend, Logan, are inseparable. She’s one of six kids in the only Jewish family in their small town. But her life is permanently altered when she is “disfigured” and blinded by a rogue firework over the summer. Now, Emma is forced to adapt. She has to learn how to live with her disability. She has to go to a school for the blind. But most of all, she’s now the “Poor Blind Kid”. She’s the “tragic accident” of her small town.

 

That is, until outgoing and popular Claire’s body is found under the bridge at the edge of town.

 

Now, Emma’s back at regular high school, but she doesn’t understand- why would someone like Claire kill herself? How has Emma, in her dark world, lasted all this time where Claire didn’t?

 

This novel phenomenally depicts how Emma sees, without her eyes, the colors of the world. Whether one has a “shiny, plastic, pink voice”, or “Smells like bread and soap” surprisingly paints a distinct picture in a reader’s mind, allowing you to empathize with Emma as the words appear in front of your eyes. The imagery is so clear; you almost forget you can’t see from Emma’s perspective.

 

This book is intended for a YA- teen audience. There are some vulgar words and mature themes, as well as characters talking openly about the delicate topic of suicide. I’d say thirteen plus is a pretty good age to experience the story.