“Keep the Wonder”

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At the Denver Art Museum, there is a photography exhibition called “Barbara Bosworth: Quiet Wonder” which runs from March 13th – September 20th.

At the Denver Art Museum, there is a photography exhibition called “Barbara Bosworth: Quiet Wonder” which runs from March 13th – September 20th. Since 1984, Barbara has been professor of photography at the Massachusetts College of Art. She uses a large-format, 8×10-inch view camera that weighs 7 pounds, and the lenses and other equipment weigh a total of around 35 pounds. She makes sure to carry both black and white and colored films so she has a choice as to what color to make the image. It looks somewhat like an accordion but with film on one end and a lens on the other. When she isn’t using a view camera, it is probably because the object that she is photographing is moving too fast.

Her photographs and style reflect who she is-nature-loving, appreciative and humble. She made a connection with the earth as a hiker. Along with her family, books have been a big influence for her. By looking through books, she fell in love with photography. She also reads lots of poetry. Poetry inspires her work and is aligned with her photography. Additionally, family, friends and everything in her life is influential to her work especially her parents. Her dad inspired and always supported her.

 

A collection of her photos feature people holding small, brightly colored, beautiful birds. In order to take such photos, Barbara worked with bird banders who obtain data regarding birds. She photographed the birds before they were banded and also photographed the moment that they were released. “It’s magical. It’s spiritual. They’re between heaven and earth.”

 

Some of her other photography pieces include three photos. This grouping “builds a sense of a place.” She’s also able to focus in and out on different parts of the scene in each photo. There’s a national registry of the oldest trees and she travels around the country photographing them as well.

 

She guides and encourages photography students how to find their way. She doesn’t allow her students to look at her photography because she feels as if they should develop their own style. “I want to inspire them to find their own voice. I ask them, ‘What’s your story?’ and encourage them.” She requests that they figure out what their interests are, by making a reading list about that topic, bringing in something non-photographic from their life, such as a collection of bird eggs, etc. and even making an oral presentation.

 

Ms. Bosworth doesn’t believe in “taking” or “shooting” photos, she likes to “make” photos. She feels as if taking someone’s photo is stealing and snatching it away from them, and she feels like “shooting” someone is just plain wrong. Barbara teaches her students not say those words and replace them with “make.”

 

The message she wants to give others through her photos is “Don’t lose the amazement”; “Keep the wonder,” ”Be amazed with the world and continue to be astonished.” Quiet Wonder is a relaxing and reflective exhibit which is sure to instill an appreciation of nature, simplicity and the world around you.