A Gem of an Organization

0
807

Would you give from your jewelry drawer to raise money to find a cure?

Would you give from your jewelry drawer to raise money to find a cure? That simple question brands Jewels for Hope, a non-profit with a vision to aid diabetes research and education efforts in conjunction with the Barbara Davis Center. 10 years after its birth , Jewels for Hope has been able to give $300,000 to advance the research efforts for the cure or life-extension of diabetic patients.

 

 

"The majority of the public is not well-versed in understanding the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes," explained Susan Squyer, the head chairman at Jewels for Hope. Type 2 is the more familiar version, associated with people being overweight, whereas Type 1 is a 24/7, insulin-dependent lifestyle. A lot of the volunteers at Jewels for Hope have diabetic relatives or friends, so they understand the life-adjustment, but the public doesn't, which is one of the missions of JFH.

 

 

Anyone can donate jewelry to the organization and be certain that they're giving to a superb cause. The accessories are refurbished, priced, and re-sold, with the profits rejuvenating the lives of diabetic patients through the Barbara Davis Center.

 

"The range is from Marti-Gras Beads to diamonds. It's a whole spectrum of stuff," said Lori Visciano.

 

While Jewels for Hope doesn't have a target consumer, they do target to the consumer. While some people prefer the top status diamonds and gold pieces, they also cater to others, like the $5 and Fab bags, which are filled with 5-7 hand-picked pieces of less-expensive jewelry.

 

In addition to buying and donating jewelry, people can assist the mission by donating time. Lori added, "We have people who like to just sit and untangle chains."

 

This gem of an organization is thriving, but is always looking for donations, volunteers, or customers. As Susan puts it, "I can't donate all the money that's needed to help or to cure this (diabetes). But, I can give my time and my talents. That's what I have to give."