Passing Meteorology Down Generations

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BBecky Ditchfield and Cory Reppenhagen Explain to Metro State’s Summer Camp for Journalism about Meteorology.

Becky Ditchfield, a meteorologist that came to Denver 10 years ago, with the dreams of being a meteorologist since she was a child, explains to seven of Metropolitan State University of Denver’s 11 year old children attending a summer camp for journalism about Meteorology, and what she and Cory Reppenhagen are doing for living. Ditchfield and Reppenhagen storm chase together in the new Weather Titan for up to about ten to twelve hours. Ditchfield explained that the most important part in her job for her is that she can save lives while she warns people about extreme weather with Reppenhagen at her side.

Ditchfield and Reppenhagen have gone through a lot side by side: “I have never seen a tornado touchdown, that was my first time ever,” Ditchfield said. Ditchfield and Reppenhagen experienced a tornado touching ground right in front of them. They explained to the summer camp participants and their supervisors that it was one of their scariest experiences.

During another experience just before noon, a different tornado hit as Ditchfield said, “To fight for what’s write for others was what was going through my mind.” She explained how she wanted to warn the people who lived near where the tornado was going to hit that they were going to have to take cover, and quickly. “There’s no place safer than home,” Reppenhagen said to the eleven year olds.

Ditchfield explains that in order to be a meteorologist, you have to have backgrounds in many knowledges to be professional. For example, you have to know the difference between many different storm clouds to be able to correctly warn everyone in the world around you, and to be able to look at the weather three to nine days out.”I would say my biggest challenge is snow forecasting,” Ditchfield said.

She also comments that tracking tornadoes is fun to do and important with many unknown variables. “Believe that you can do it,” she added on, “It is a risk that you know you are taking.”